Hugh Jackman FanYour source for the Australian actor, Hugh Jackman.

Some new information regarding Les Miserables has been released by Hugh Jackman himself during an interview with Collider. He talks about this three-hour audition yet again, and whether or not the film will be shot in 3D. (He’ll be visiting London in a couple of weeks to do tests with director Tom Hooper, which will determine what medium to shoot the film in.) Check it out below or visit the source:

The reveal of Jackman’s three-hour audition:
“We shoot in March. I am going in the next couple of weeks to do my first tests there. I auditioned for it and had about a 3-hour audition for it about 3 months ago. I’m really pumped about doing this. I’ve done a lot of musicals and I’ve done a lot of movies, so this feels like something that I’ve been waiting to do.”

Whether or not Les Mis will be shot in 3D:
“It’s in discussion. Honestly, that’s probably gonna be part of what the tests are about, to see what that does. It’s always interesting – how do you actually convey thought through song? We’re used to the convention on stage. In film, we used to be used to it, and now sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. You need to be fresh and really look at the material. I think [Hooper’s] basically gonna do it, screen it, look at it, and see if it adds something genuinely or not. I mean, the strength of Les Mis is in its characters and the emotion, so if it aids that, fantastic. If it doesn’t I’m sure we won’t. It is not like there are massive special effects in Les Mis, you know?”

His favorite songs from the Les Mis stage production:
“’Who Am I?’ I love. That’s a great one. ‘Bring Him Home’ is great. Both of those songs are mine. God, I don’t think there is a bad song in that whole piece.”

IndieWire has a great new interview with Hugh Jackman, in which he speaks about the future of The Wolverine. Many movie fans were skeptical when another screenwriter – Mark Bomback – was brought on board to rewrite the much-raved about McQuarrie script, but Hugh clarifies that decision. Additionally, he mentions whether or not this upcoming movie will be his last performance as Wolverine, and why he wanted to do the X-Men: First Class cameo.

1. The Wolverine will go next for Jackman after he finishes Les Miserables.
“If it wasn’t for Les Mis, we’re ready now,” Jackman told the gathered press. “Now that Jim [Mangold]’s on board, we’re ready to go. For Les Mis to work, we would have had to start Wolverine, basically, yesterday. So when we needed to press the button, we weren’t quite ready. So it will happen straight after.”

2. What happened to Darren Aronofsky?
“His personal life precluded him from making the movie,” explains Jackman. “I asked him to do X-Men 3, I asked him to do Wolverine one and he said, ‘It’s not so much for me.’ And then he read this and said, ‘Man, I’m in. This is the best comic movie script I’ve ever read’ and he’s been dying to do one for a long time.”

3. What made James Mangold the right choice?
Jackman says there was no shortage of directors willing to throw their hats into the pool as Aronofsky’s replacement. But it was Mangold who had the best handle on the material. “Many directors wanted to do this film, I’m happy to say, because of the strength of the script. When he came in he just had such a clear vision of where this movie should go. He had the best take. He’s done many, many genres. I look at 3:10 to Yuma, and when he started talking about ‘The Outlaw Josey Wales’ I was like, ‘Okay, now we’re on the right track.” He had a couple of things which, I think, even in Darren’s version of the script, hadn’t been solved that he just knew he had the key.”

4. Mark Bomback’s recent re-write work is not an overhaul, but more of a polish on McQuarrie’s script.
“When a director takes over any script,” says Jackman, “they need to make it their movie. So Jim hired Mark to help him make the movie his own. Darren had worked on the script himself and taken it in a certain direction that was right for him. And that would have been a great version of the movie. I’ve seen Jim’s version now and, you know, Jim saw things that weren’t working for him that were working for Darren. And I’ve got to hand it to Fox and to Jim, it’s easy when you start with the best script we’ve had from Chris McQuarrie. Which is why Darren signed on. So once you have that, that’s 80, 85 percent of your movie.”

5. The Wolverine is based on Miller’s Japanese saga, but it will not be an exact translation.
“It’s a little darker and, I think, a little more true to the character,” Jackman stressed. “If you read all of [the Japanese saga] there is a lot of it that is a little disparate and some of it’s got X-Men in it. There’s a wedding and all that. So we take license with that.”

6. Jackman’s cameo in X-Men: First Class was all about the F-bomb.
“They asked me to do that cameo a year before I did it and I said, ‘All right, pitch me the concept,’ ” Jackman recalled. “They did and I liked it. I said, ‘Is anyone else swearing in the movie?’ and they said, ‘We don’t think so.’ I said, ‘Promise me no one else swears in the movie and I’m in.’ 50 percent of Wolverine’s dialogue should be ‘fuck.’ That feels right for me. And actually that particular take was an ad-lib I did at the end. There was more secrecy to shooting that than I have ever known. I actually checked into the hotel and they had no reservation under Jackman. I was under some comic book name I had never even heard of.”

So might Jackman pop up in a ‘First Class’ sequel?
“If they come up with as good of an idea as last time,” Jackman says with a big smile, “Yeah, I could see it.”

7. He isn’t tired of Wolvy just yet.
“I love that character,” he said. “It was the first film I did in America and somehow I lucked upon the greatest of all the superhero roles. His human dilemmas and demons and battles feel more real. I don’t feel like a guy with claws and ridiculous hair. I feel like a guy battling against life.”

8. X-Men 4 probably won’t happen, but The Wolverine might not be the character’s swan song.
“I don’t see it. I can only see one movie ahead,” he said deflating hopes of a 4th X-Men film, despite talk in recent years by the producers of making one more. “I’m pretty sure I’m well into the second half of this match. I don’t know exactly when the end is, but I only go one at a time. If this is the last one, fingers crossed, man, I just hope we finally get that hole in one.”

September 27th, 2011

‘Real Steel’ Photo Call in Sydney

A very funny new TV appearance featuring Hugh Jackman is now available online. Fellow Australian, Rove McManus – now in Los Angeles – has a new show entitled “Rove LA,” and Hugh was recently a special guest alongside “Project Runway”‘s Tim Gunn and comedian Paul F. Tompkins. The show is pretty long and contains various bits of information, some of which is known to fans (his early days as Coco the clown) and some new tidbits as well (his early days of being a speed walker). Tune in to hear about dancing, punching, and what kind of gift Rove gave Hugh and guests from the LA County Coroner.

Although I can’t embed the videos, I highly recommend visiting Rove LA and checking out the interview. (You find find all five parts of episode two on this page.)

An informative new interview with Collider has just been released, in which Hugh Jackman talks about a few upcoming projects. Les Miserables is mentioned, including what sort of training he’s been doing leading up to playing the iconic Jean Valjean — and whether or not he’ll be shirtless in the role. Check out the interview below, or simply visit the source.

Question: Is Wolverine 2 your next movie?
No, Les Miserables. I’m doing that. Tom Hooper is directing that. That’s going to be at the beginning of next year. Before that, I’m doing a one-man show on Broadway, and then Wolverine. So, it’s an eclectic year.

Are there any aspects of Wolverine that you get to explore this time, that you didn’t get to with the previous films?
Absolutely. Every time, I feel. This time, more than anything, I think we’ve really nailed down that character. I think the audience and myself and the writers were like, “Enough of the [missing] memory with ‘Who am I? What happened in my past?'” That’s enough. I think we’ve explored that a lot. Now, it’s this great backdrop of Japan, which is going to be fantastic for this character. It’s a very rich source material with the comic book. And, there’s more ladies in this movie, which is a nice change from the last one. It was very testosterone heavy.

Will your shirt be remaining on, for Les Miserables?
I actually told that story to Tom Hooper, because one of the first scenes actually shows him in the prison camp that he’s in, being punished and whipped, and stuff like that. I said, “I can tell you right now, if you have me with my shirt off, people are going to say, ‘You were just doing what Jackman demanded in his contract.'” And he said, “I don’t think we need to do it without your shirt,” and I said, “Good.” So, when you see the movie, you’ll see.

Is it intimidating to take on something like Les Miserables, or is that the fun of it?
Yeah, but that is the fun of it, exactly. It’s intimidating, and that’s the fun of it. I feel, you have to be a little bit intimidated or a little bit nervous. The percentage is probably 80/20. If 80% of you is really, really confident you’re going to nail it, and 20% of you is genuinely, really not so sure, that’s the kind of percentage you need to push yourself on, to do better than you’ve ever before. If it’s 100%, then I feel the audience can feel it. I feel like Jean Valjean is one the great literary figures in musical theatre. It’s one of the most famous characters of all time. Whoever is playing it, it should be them at their best, you know? That’s why I’m singing everyday and have been for awhile. And, that’s why I auditioned for the part. I rang Tom Hooper and I said, “Tom, I’m coming in and I’m auditioning for you.” He said, “Well, I actually haven’t made my deal yet.” I said, “I don’t care. I’m coming in now.” That audition was three hours. This was not one where I was going to sit back and wait to see if it came to me or not. I chased it.

How many times have you seen the musical?
Three times.

Is there a difference in your approach to theatrical work, as opposed to movie work?
Not really. Obviously, on the day there is a difference. As an actor, you have many tools – your body, your voice, your emotions, mentally. In film, you have your eyes because they communicate your thought process. In fact, generally in film, what you don’t say is more important than what you say. That’s not so much the case for stage. However, if you haven’t done that work and you don’t know what’s going on internally, particularly for a musical, and there’s not real thought behind the song, then no one will feel anything. But, essentially, acting is acting. It’s the same thing. So, I’m forever grateful that I did theater first. I think it’s much easier to be able to distill the technique from theater. It’s not like, “Let’s just add water to film.” There are genuine muscles that you need on the stage, that you don’t develop in film.

In your one-man Broadway show, will you be singing?
You bet! I have an 18-piece orchestra. I sing. I dance. I tell some stories. I ad-lib a bit. Peter Allen, who I did in The Boy From Oz, makes a comeback. It’s genuinely my idea of a really good time. I figure, if I’m not having a good time, no one else will.

Has Brett Ratner asked you to do any musical numbers for the next Oscars?
No, but I did email him to congratulate him on what I think was an inspired choice of Eddie Murphy. I said, “I don’t know what you did. I’m sure they’ve asked Eddie for the last 25 years, and I don’t know how you got him across the line.” As an Eddie Murphy fan, particularly with his stand-up, and he’s a big movie star, I can’t wait to see what he does. Nobody knows, and that’s always the most exciting thing about the Oscars. You never really know what’s going to happen, and I think having Eddie will exacerbate that.

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